Cape Town Annual Report 2016 2017

Annual Report 2016-2017

Cape Town We Are Capetonian #3 Frank

We are Capetonian Series #3: Frank Mukendi

We are CapeTonian is a collaboration between Cape Town Partnership and the Scalabrini Centre of Cape Town that celebrates migrants’ contributions to the economic and cultural vibrancy of Cape Town. By creating a space to hear a different story each month, we hope this series will enhance and challenge common perceptions of migration.

Frank Mukendi is a fashion and streetwear photographer who lives and works in Cape Town. Originally from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Frank connects with people by striking up conversations about and capturing images of the clothes they choose to wear.

Tell us a bit about your birth.

I was born in Lubumbashi, a city in southern DRC where there are only two seasons – the rainy season and the dry one. I am the firstborn son, but have three older sisters and one younger brother. In our culture, there is a particular feast you have when a firstborn son is born. Most of my family still lives in Lubumbashi.

And where do you live now?

I live in Claremont.

How did you come to live in Cape Town?

As soon as I finished school, I knew I wanted to leave Lumumbashi and look for a challenge elsewhere. One of my sisters was living in Johannesburg and invited me to join her there, so I did.
I soon found, however, that Joburg moved at a pace that was just too fast for me, especially because I couldn’t speak English very well at the time. This made finding work really hard, so I decided to come and join a friend in Cape Town.

What did you do when you first arrived in the Mother City?

It’s a funny story, actually. When I first arrived, I met a woman who really wanted to learn French. She asked if I could teach her. Thinking she was joking, I said I’d charge her R10 an hour and to my surprise, she actually pitched up for the first lesson. We started with the alphabet and greetings, but turns out I’m a terrible teacher.

It all worked out well in the end, though, as she ended up helping me get my first job at a clothing shop in St George’s Mall. It was very challenging, as I was still learning English, but everyone wanted me to speak their language to – Afrikaans, Xhosa, English. Three languages all at once! Xhosa was pretty easy to get, at least, because it’s quite close to Swahili, which is one of the languages we speak in the DRC.

Now, I can speak French, Swahili, English, Xhosa, Lingala and a bit of Afrikaans.

So what kind of work do you do now?

I’m a photographer. But, this isn’t what I was ‘supposed’ to become. In DRC, if your father is an engineer, you become an engineer. So, I started off by studying engineering at university, but I did not finish.

When I came here I wanted to do something that I was passionate about, so signed up for a graphic design and photography course at the College of Cape Town. I loved photography from the start, so decided to concentrate on that.

Now, here I am today, doing mostly fashion and street photography under the name Mukendi Photography.

What do you love about photography?

When you’re walking in the street and see the confidence someone has when they’re wearing something they obviously love. Something that someone else may not be able to pull off. And when you ask them why they’re wearing it they get really excited to share their story. This makes me love what I do.

What is your favourite thing about Cape Town?

The people. Cape Town has good people and also many different kinds of people. You will meet every type of person here, from all over. I’ve even met people from Czechoslovakia.

What is your least favourite thing about Cape Town?

It’s quite tough to make a name for yourself as a creative professional. For example, I recently got a contract for a good photography job. As soon as a white guy from overseas arrived, they dropped me and used him. I would have understood if it was about my work, but I don’t think he was better than me. After he left, the same people still want to work with me. I really don’t like it when people undermine me in this way.

Do you feel Capetonian?

Hmmm … Do I feel Capetonian? (laughs) I don’t know. I don’t know how to answer that question. Maybe the best way to explain it is to compare it to how I feel in DRC. When I go back, I feel Congolese because I know where to go and people treat me as equal.

I guess you can call yourself Capetonian, yes, but sometimes in some places, you feel as though you really don’t belong, just because you don’t speak the language.

If you could sum up Cape Town in one word, what would it be?

Diversity.

When do you feel most integrated into the city?

When there’s a big event – Open Streets, for example, or Streetopia in Observatory. I feel good to be there because I don’t think people judge you.

Nobody cares about what the next person’s doing. Everybody feels free to bring their own ideas. I feel good when I’m in that kind of situation.

When do you feel least part of the city?

In my area of work. I don’t always feel part of the city. While I was studying, I didn’t experience discrimination, but you find a lot of it in the professional world.

Do you feel like you are contributing to Cape Town?

Yes, I do. Especially when I get to photograph meaningful moments and events and share them with the world. Recently, for example, I took photos at a basketball workshop that helps disadvantaged kids and I gave the photos to them, which made them very happy.

Have you ever gone back to DRC?

No, I haven’t. I really want to, but last time I wanted to go, my mom came to visit here, so we had to save up for that.

What do you miss most about DRC?

I miss friends, family and the food! In DRC, we love fish – we have a lot of sorts of fish. But here, there aren’t nearly as many.

What do you wish other Capetonians knew about you?

I want people to know that I love to hear people talking about their fashion, I love their confidence and passion for what they wear. I learn from every single person I meet.

I want people to know I work hard to be where I am – and I’m still working hard to be where I want to be.

Check out Frank’s work on Facebook and Instagram.

Cape Town We Are Capetonian #2 Mavelous Bunu

We are Capetonian Series #2: Mavelous Bunu

We are CapeTonian is a collaboration between Cape Town Partnership and the Scalabrini Centre of Cape Town that celebrates migrants’ contributions to the economic and cultural vibrancy of Cape Town. By creating a space to hear a different story each month, we hope this series will enhance and challenge common perceptions of migration.

Mavelous Bunu is a multi-talented businesswoman, who’s found her passion in the preparation and sale of wholesome, traditional meals at The African Deli. She grew up in Zimbabwe, lived in Botswana for a while and now calls the Mother City home. We find out more about her journey to becoming a Capetonian.

Where were you born?

I was born in Zimbabwe, in a city called Mutare. It’s an evergreen city with beautiful views, especially on Christmas Pass, which is probably one of the most famous tourist attractions in the area.

Where do you live now?

I live in Delft, on the outskirts of Cape Town.

How did you come to be in Cape Town? And when did you first move here?

I came to South Africa from Botswana – where I had been living for a while – in 2007. So, I’ve been here for almost 10 years now.

Have you ever gone back to Zimbabwe?

Yes, I’ve been back three times and hoping to go again in December this year. I’m also hoping my mom can come and visit at some point.

What made you decide on Cape Town?

I was very excited about the idea of the 2010 Soccer World Cup and hoped that coming here would help me find greener pastures.

Where does your family live?

My mother is in Zimbabwe, living in a rural area called Buhera. But my son and my brother came to join me in South Africa in 2009.

What did you do when you first arrived in the city?

It was difficult to find a good job at first. I started working at a small coffee shop in Durbanville, but had to find something else to make ends meet, so found a job as a housekeeper and childminder.

What do you do now?

I do a lot of things, but my main occupation right now is running a kitchen, called The African Deli with two other Zimbabwean ladies.

How did the idea for The African Deli come about?

It was actually born through a Facebook group, where Zimbabwean women living in all parts of the world share their daily struggles and joys. When I found these two other ladies were also living in Cape Town, we decided to do something together. This all happened just more than a year ago.

Can you tell us a bit more about the food you make?

We make daily meals, but also offer catering for weddings, church gatherings and all sorts of events. For the daily meals, we cook the food here in the kitchen at the Scalabrini Centre and then go out and sell it at two points in the city: the Garden Centre and at the train station. We can make anything! But specialise in a variety of African dishes.

What do you like the most about the Mother City?

I like that Cape Town is surrounded by the sea and there’s always a cool breeze. Even in summer, you don’t feel uncomfortable in the heat, like you do in Mutare, which is landlocked and far away from the ocean.

What do you dislike about Cape Town?

The violence and crime. There’s a lot of theft too. I have been robbed at gunpoint for my phone.

Do you feel Capetonian?

Yes, I can feel I’m a Capetonian, because I live here and I mingle with South Africans on a daily basis.

If you could sum up Cape Town in one word, what would it be?

Beautiful!

When do you most feel part of the city?

Actually, when I’m in the city centre, because there’s a lot of movement and the police are walking around, which makes me feel much safer than at home.

When do you least feel part of the city?

When I’m at home, especially at night. But, it’s only sometimes I feel that way. Not always.

Do you feel like you are contributing to Cape Town in any way? If so, how?

Yes, I am contributing to Cape Town, because I’m feeding thousands of people.

What do you wish other Capetonians knew about you?

I wish they knew about The African Deli, so that we can grow into a big restaurant.

Cape Town We Are Capetonian #1 Patrick Nzinga

We are Capetonian Series #1: Patrick Nzinga

We are CapeTonian is a collaboration between Cape Town Partnership and the Scalabrini Centre of Cape Town that celebrates migrants’ contributions to the economic and cultural vibrancy of Cape Town. By creating a space to hear a different story each month, we hope this series will enhance and challenge common perceptions of migration.

Patrick Nzinga, 21, came to South Africa at the age of two when his family fled the Angolan civil war. He grew up in a children’s home in Cape Town, and is now a resident chef-in-training, based in the labyrinth of kitchens at the sumptuous Mount Nelson Hotel. Patrick shares his story and explains his strong passion for social change in the Mother City.

Where were you born?

I was born in Luanda, Angola. There are many different cultural groups there. I am of the Ambundu group.

Where do you live now?

Currently I am staying on Kloof Street. I used to stay in SOS children’s village, a children’s home. I moved here to complete my tertiary education and stay at accommodation provided by the Mount Nelson Hotel as part of my internship here. I stay on the premises.

How did you come to be in Cape Town?

From Luanda to Cape Town was a heavy mission. All I remember was being on my uncle’s back, at the age of two. I remember fences and police men in uniform, and police trucks and batons. We were on a journey in a forest at some point. We were escaping from some sort of civil war.

What made you decide on Cape Town?

I did not choose to come here. I was only two years old. It was my family’s choice to settle here. But I think they chose Cape Town because people have more of a sympathetic feel than bigger cities like Johannesburg.

Where do your family live?

I ended up in a children’s home because there were issues at home. I was placed in a children’s home by a social worker after running away from home. It was only much later that I found out about brothers and other family members. I was always a curious child and I made the most of my time in the children’s home – and it was here that I got accustomed to life in South Africa. I was never a problem child! I was often by myself and just asking why these things happened to me.

What do you like the most about Cape Town?

My favourite thing about Cape Town is the diversity. The city has a rich culture and history because of Nelson Mandela, where we came from in the past, the Apartheid regime, the Europeans coming down and taking over… it is a mix.

What do you dislike the most about Cape Town?

The worst thing about Cape Town is having to look around and seeing underprivileged people. They are shouting and calling out for help but we turn a blind eye. Even in the rural areas where people are pleading for change and resources and asking to change the community, but we are ignoring their requests. That is what I dislike the most. The poor stay poor and the rich get richer.

Do you feel Capetonian?

I feel Capetonian, 100%. I feel it in the way I dress – the men have a particular dress code here, which I think is inspired by hip-hop culture but we made it our own – I feel it in my slang and lingo also. People often think I am originally from here.

The saddest part is that some people ask me where I am from. When I say, “Angola”, they say, “oh, do you speak Portuguese?” And I have to say no because I left Angola so long ago. It is confusing for them and sad for me.

If you could sum up Cape Town in one word, what would it be?

Lekker.

When do you feel most integrated/ ‘at home’ in the city?

When I feel most at home is when I am taking my morning hikes, when I go up the mountain. The one I like the most is Lion’s Head because it is the easiest. When you are climbing you can take your time to appreciate nature and the indigenous nature – I feel most at home because I am in touch with mother nature.

When do you feel least integrated in the city?

Actually, I don’t. Wherever I am, I am good at adapting.

What kind of work do you do?

I am in the final year of a four-year chef internship here at Mount Nelson Hotel. I would like, in the future, to work in other places like Johannesburg, cruise ships, even France. That is my dream.

Do you feel like you are contributing to Cape Town in any way? If so, how?

Right now, no – but I think I have served a substantial amount of hours to community work in the past. I used to volunteer in old age homes. This is where I found my passion and drive for cooking – I would go after church on a Sunday and I used to cook for them or wash their dishes.

Have you ever gone back to Angola?

No. Not in nineteen years. I would like to go and give back.

What do you wish other Capetonians knew about you?

I want people to know that I have a vision. That I have a fast metabolism for growth.

I want them to know that I want to stimulate the mind-set of people that are willing to join the movement — the movement to take the city forward to its highest point. I know I am young, but only God can judge me. I just imagine all of us united and eating for the same table. I know it sounds crazy but I think it is possible.

Cape Town a principal's war against apathy

A principal’s war against apathy

June 20 is World Refugee Day. We celebrate one of Cape Town’s school principals who is using the challenges of xenophobia to build momentum around creative learning.

One school principal is using the challenges of xenophobia to fuel a programme countering her students’ apathy. When Mrs. Little started working at Vista High School, which accommodates over 550 learners, she found the levels of apathy among students to be highly concerning. “The learners have high potential and high capacity; they could be sponsored for tertiary education. It is the apathy that is keeping them back, and it is tragic”.

The cure to apathy, says Mrs. Little, is diversity. By diversity, she means diverse teaching methods, diverse content, diverse context and the genuine integration of diverse learners. Central to bringing about diversity in her school is the Unite as One Programme, a project initiated by the Scalabrini Centre of Cape Town, a non-governmental organization that promotes the integration in the Western Cape. Unite started in the wake of the 2008 xenophobic violence in South Africa, and provides four schools in the Western Cape with a specially devised curriculum that seeks to encourage intercultural understanding.

Why is this so important for Mrs Little? It is not only that diversity counters apathy, which leads to better results for her learners. More widely, Mrs Little knows that these learners are the future South Africa. “When xenophobia flares up in South Africa” Mrs Little tells me, ‘learners are at risk of latching on. I tell my learners at assembly, ‘don’t listen to these xenophobic comments. This is not you. This is society now. You young people are the future society, and you can make it different’.

I tell my learners at assembly, ‘don’t listen to these xenophobic comments. This is not you. This is society now. You young people are the future society, and you can make it different”

Mrs Little was the principal of Maitland High School for seven years, a school with around 60% non-South African learners, from countries such as the Democratic Republic of Congo, Zimbabwe and Somalia. She recalls her dismay at realizing that some of her learners were perpetrators of the xenophobic violence that occurred in 2008. The school quickly kicked into action; non-South African children mentored younger South African children, while an after-school programme hosted motivational speakers and workshops. “That period was heavy” Mrs Little recalls.

“For some migrant learners, the school was their only safe space. These programmes helped heal the wounds that were created by xenophobia. Learners from different counties actually started to rely on each other for learning.”

She has noted that, sometimes, non-South African learners are more eager to learn and more engaged at school than their South African counterparts. This might be due, she explains, to the fact that migrant learners come from countries where an education is not guaranteed, or where the quality of learning is lower. Furthermore many migrant learners are desperately trying to catch up their education in a different context and in a different language. Mrs Little hastens to add that “after a few years, though, these kinds of learners are also at risk of catching the bug of apathy”.

This is where Unite comes in. The philosophy of Unite is to learn in a fun way. 

Facilitated by young people after school, the programme uses drama, singing, art and debate as tools of learning about diversity. Jade Bell, who runs the project, considers the main aims as “working on identity, integration, and diversity. “We work in the hope that improving learners’ self-worth, self-confidence, self and social understanding will aid integration and diversity.”

Mrs Little has observed that the teachings of the programme are not only about diversity, but about leadership and confidence, and have helped to give the learners a sense of interdependence. Run by a group of young people working at Scalabrini, Unite also runs holiday camps and programmes. Mind-set changes in learners, such as Vincent Mafilika, 17 are evidence of the change “”It changed the way I see society. I used to take one view of how I see society and not consider anything else. When you would tell me, that you are gay I would not care about you. Now I am able to see and understand your point of view”. She knew some of these learners to be apathetic in class, and here they were debating South Africa’s participation in the ICC and performing on stage.

“It changed the way I see society. I used to take one view of how I see society and not consider anything else. When you would tell me, that you are gay I would not care about you. Now I am able to see and understand your point of view”

“Of course, genuine integration of learners will take a very long time, but at least such events are a sign that change can happen. But this all starts with understanding what makes learners tick. Once they want to learn, the opportunities for learning are endless”.

This article is part of Scalabrini’s World Refugee Day campaign #myhomeisyourhome, celebrating those who create welcoming spaces – wherever they are from, and wherever they live.

Pictures: Learners of the Unite Programme, Credit: Scalabrini Centre

Cape Town UNITE Human Rights Day 2017 Video

UNITE

What do Human Rights mean to you?

Mrs. Masuki shares her story on her organic farming in Cape Town.

Cape Town world refugee day at the scalabrini centre of cape town

World Refugee Day at Scalabrini Centre Cape Town

In 2017 we will celebrate World Refugee Day through a media campaign.

The campaign will celebrate and unite those who welcome others in their own spaces. It will highlight the message that, no matter who you are or where you are from – whether you are a migrant in South Africa, South African, or a person who is in another country, where there are South African migrants – ‘my house is your house’.

Cape Town Submission: Scalabrini’s Response to the Refugees Amendment Bill

Scalabrini’s Response to the Refugees Amendment Bill

Cape Town Border management agency bill 2017

Border Management Agency Bill

Cape Town Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

In the past year the South African government has published some important policy documents that indicate a serious shift in the future of migration policy for the country. This includes a new Green Paper on International Migration, the Refugees Amendment Bill, and the Border Management Authority Bill. Here we answer some FAQs around these policies.